Graduates’ affective transfer of research skills and evidence based practice from university to employment in clinics- fully open access article

BMC Medical Education published this article just now, co-authored with 6 fantastic Masters students and Dr Fizza Sabir

https://rdcu.be/b3iI7

BMCMEDEd

The article acknowledges the work fantastic done by Sophie Karanicolas, Cathy Snelling and Clinton Kempster in their innovative use of the RSD in their degree.

This work resulted in amazing graduates who were interviewed one year after the degree, when employed. A striking feature is how passionate the graduates are about the skills that they developed in the degree and then used with patients.

This is the first article on the RSD work that richly unearths the affective domain of attitudes, values and emotions, and shows the intimate connections to the more cogntive aspects of learning and work.

Blooms Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain is famous, but the Affective Domain is not so well known, yet Bloom’s separation of cognitive and affective domains has had a powerful and pervasive influence across education.

Yet Krathwohl, Bloom and Masia (1964) noted, ‘the fact that we attempt to analyse the affective area separately from the cognitive is not intended to suggest that there is a fundamental separation. There is none.’

This article highlights the intimate connections of cognitive and affective domains, as well as of university learning and skills used in workplaces.

While the role of emotions, values and attitudes in learning is hard to deny, the question remains about how to effectively deal with the affective domain to maximise learning. What do you think and what do you do?

 

Special Issue on the RSD: Critiques, Curriculum and Connections

The Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice has just launched Volume 15, Issue 4, a special issue on the Research Skill Development framework, and its various uses, formulations and evaluations:

Research Skill Development spanning Higher Education: Curricula, critiques and connections
https://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol15/iss4/ (If this link does not work on campus, due to your local browser configuration try http://www.library.uow.edu.au/services/UOW026590.html
The 8 articles are:

Research skill development spanning higher education: Critiques, curriculum and connections

Frameworks and freedoms: Supervising research learning and the undergraduate dissertation

Research skills in the first-year biology practical – Are they there?

Graduate students’ research-based learning experiences in an online Master of Education program

Evaluating the effectiveness of postgraduate research skills training and its alignment with the Research Skill Development framework

Integrated academic literacy development: Learner-teacher autonomy for MELTing the barriers

From Research Skill Development to Work Skill Development

Laurentian University uses the WSD to survey career paths

I recently heard that Sue Bandaranaike was at the WACE International Research Symposium in Stuttgart, to discuss upcoming research underpinned by the WSD framework. Sue has been a keen advocate for WSD-based research since co-developing the framework in 2009.

Her upcoming study, (a collaboration with Nicole Tardif and Patricia Orozco from Laurentian University) will aim to discover the skills, behaviours and competencies that constitute expertise in mining. The study will involve surveys with mining and exploration professionals, as well as HR representatives from mining, exploration and consulting. With 40% of employees in the mining and metals industries expected to retire in the next few years, this will be a timely piece of research, and a good example of putting the RSD into practice.

MELT the SEA-DR conference

If you are reading this on 28 June 2018, it’s a good chance you are attending the second day of the SE Asia Design Research conference, hosted by Syiah Kuala University in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. This is John from University of Adelaide writing. Welcome to the second keynote of the day, which is designed to MELT your mind and help you empower students for learning in Science, Maths and Technology. If you are not attending, feel free to read on, and you might want to visit the conference website http://seadr.unsyiah.ac.id/. The conference focus is research into the design of learning environments for science, mathematics & technology as disciplines and STEM as a whole.

This blog post provides a multiple choice question below. Please be ready to choose one of the six options when I give the signal. I suggest you wait till I deal with the ‘six facets’ of MELT before you choose, as I will explain each option in detail. If you missed the presentation (or want to review ideas) visit www.melt.edu.au and www.i-melt.edu.au

Discuss the question below with one or two others, but answer the question from your own perspective.

If you are a student currently, answer from your perspective. If you are teaching, consider a specific group of students.

Question: Of the six facets of MELT, which one is the most difficult for students (or you) when engaging in complex learning?

Facets for voting

When everyone has answered, we will look at the results together (but you can preview them too).

Thanks for your participation

John

MELT @ Singapore Institute of Technology

For our MELT session Monday 28 May 2018 with colleagues at SIT, there are certain questions for your consideration:

Q1.

Facets for voting

Q2 What proportion of students, in a cohort of interest to you, have shown evidence up to this point of being able to work at Initiate level of MELT autonomy?

 

Q3 What questions or comments do you have about MELT or its application? (add to ‘comments’)

 

MELT for scaffolding competency: 4th Webinar in advance of I-MELT

Join presenters from Victorian Institutions for a webinar on using the MELT (Models of Engaged Learning and Teaching) for Scaffolding Competency in contexts as varied as the Nursing Handover and learning in mathematics. This is the fourth webinar on the series on the various uses of the Models of Engaged Learning and Teaching www.melt.edu.au

Short papers from the I-MELT conference website on this topic are available:

In a mathematics context   https://www.adelaide.edu.au/rsd/i-melt/papers/#Vervoorst

In a nursing handover context   https://reskidev.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/clinical-handover4oct17.pdf

In a Curriculum Renewal context: https://www.adelaide.edu.au/rsd/i-melt/papers/TorresIMELT2017paper.pdf

Reading the abstracts of these in advance will be a great warm-up for the webinar.

Twenty plus short papers for I-MELT www.i-melt/papers/ on themes including Evidenced Based Decision Making, and Work Integrated Learning are also available.

Date: Thursday 16 November, 1 hour
12.30 pm Central Daylight time (+10.30 GMT/Universal time)
1.00 pm Eastern Daylight time
12.00 pm Eastern Standard time
10.00 am WA

URL: https://adelaide.zoom.us/j/311161539

The Zoom platform is web-based and user friendly
Equipment: A headset is good for speaking quality, but not essential- you may just want to text chat or observe.

Please run a sound-check within Zoom before commencement time. Click on the arrow next to the mic icon, bottom left, choose ‘Audio options’ and click ‘Test computer mic and speakers’.

I hope to see you online
John

Further information john.willison@adelaide.edu.au

How to build Rigour into WIL Programs

If you are running, or thinking of running, a Work Integrated Learning program, consider the following papers and the webinar run by Ray Tolhurst (University of Wollongong and Suzanne Schibeci (University of New South Wales)

Papers: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/rsd/i-melt/papers/

Webinar: Using the Work Skill Development Framework (WSD) to Build Rigour

into WIL Programs

Date: Friday 27 October, 1 hour
2.30 pm Central Daylight time
3.00 pm Eastern Daylight time
2.00 pm Eastern Standard time
12.00 noon WA
(+10.30 GMT/Universal time)

URL: https://adelaide.zoom.us/j/933991892

The idea behind Ray and Suzanne’s presentation is that a conceptual framework- the WSD– can be helpful and even provocative to help students understand the thinking and action processes involved in Work Integrated Learning.

You might want to ask some questions re their use of the WSD, or some broader questions about WIL.

I am in a School of Education, and Education as a discipline has been doing WIL as long as their has been Teacher Education & Training- but use of the WSD is useful to unpack and understand the practices in Teaching Professional Placements. The same could be said for other areas that have a long history with placement, such Medicine & Nursing. However some disciplines have little WIL history and the WSD may be useful to help disciplines conceptualise major purposes and outcomes. In all cases the WSD can help students make their thinking processes visible- to themselves, their university supervisors, to their work placement managers and to future employers.

 

 

Teaching Evidence Based Decision Making: MELT disciplinary perspectives

In the build-up to the International Conference on Models of Engaged Learning and Teaching (I-MELT) 11-13 December 2017 we will feature papers on a variety of themes, and run webinars by groups from different states on these themes.

The two papers attached are on the theme of Evidence Based Decision Making:

Transforming teaching practices: A model to conquer Evidence Based Decision Making skills

Evidence Based Decision Making_SA4Oct:.

The authors are from 4 Higher Education Institutions and a School, all in South Australia.

And…

Scaffolding Clinical Reasoning and Decision Making: Clinical Handover

clinical handover4Oct17

Katie Piper from Monash University.

The South Australian group is also running a webinar on this theme Friday 6 October for 1 hour:
1.00 pm Eastern Daylight time
12.00 pm Eastern Standard time

12.30 pm Central Daylight time
10.00 am WA
(+10.30 GMT/Universal time)
URL: https://adelaide.zoom.us/j/602861578

Read the abstracts of the attached papers in advance of the webinar to be warmed up, so you can MELT in the webinar and find ways to MELT your classes.

Three questions that I am interested in your perspective on: how much difference in approach to evidence based decision making is there between disciplines or even within a discipline? What about differences in approach to teaching and learning EBDM? How useful are the shared parameters of MELT  for sensible conversations about EBDM approaches?

 

 

Early bird registration for I-MELT closes 30 September 17

The Full Program (draft) is now available for the International conference on Models of Engaged Learning and Teaching. Go to www.i-melt.edu,au to get a great sense of keynotes, presentations and workshops that you could experience at the conference.

Make the most of early-bird registration before 30 September

www.i-melt.edu.au/registration/

I hope to see you at the National Wine Centre, 11-13 December 2017 during the beautiful early summer of Adelaide.

John